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Notes from NPAP Program & Continuing Education Events:

May 20, 2018
Psychoanalytic Education -The Illusion of a Future?: A Conversation

Moderator:
Peter Zimmermann

Presenters:
Carl Jacobs, Michael Garfinkle,
Aleksandra Wagner, James Holmes, Gina Gold

Left to right: Dr. Peter Zimmerman, Dr. Carl Jacobs, Dr. Michael Garfinkle, Dr. Aleksandra Wagner, Dr. James Holmes, and Gina Gold LP

The first of several discussions on the Future of Psychoanalytic Education began with a panel comprised of Dr. Carl Jacobs, Dr. Michael Garfinkle, Dr. Aleksandra Wagner, Dr. James Holmes and advanced candidate and licensed psychoanalyst, Gina Gold. Dr. Peter Zimmermann moderated.

Dr. Zimmermann noted “significant ad hoc modifications” in the training program since our inception 70 years ago. We are not now entirely free to choose how to train candidates with the advent of licensure in New York State. Before licensure, our candidate was someone who had studied psychoanalysis or had been in an analysis. This person already loved the subject and we still welcome them at our Open Houses. However, there is a new kind of candidate who is interested in career change and seeks the license. It is up to us then to engage this person in the study of psychoanalysis so that they come to love it too. What kind of training program will make them want to come and stay? How do we help candidates find their voices amid proliferating theories? Dr. Zimmermann invited us to suspend our beliefs about training and open our minds to how it might be in the 21st century.

Dr. Zimmermann noted “significant ad hoc modifications” in the training program since our inception 70 years ago. We are not now entirely free to choose how to train candidates with the advent of licensure in New York State. Before licensure, our candidate was someone who had studied psychoanalysis or had been in an analysis. This person already loved the subject and we still welcome them at our Open Houses. However, there is a new kind of candidate who is interested in career change and seeks the license. It is up to us then to engage this person in the study of psychoanalysis so that they come to love it too. What kind of training program will make them want to come and stay? How do we help candidates find their voices amid proliferating theories? Dr. Zimmermann invited us to suspend our beliefs about training and open our minds to how it might be in the 21st century.

Dr. Zimmermann noted “significant ad hoc modifications” in the training program since our inception 70 years ago. We are not now entirely free to choose how to train candidates with the advent of licensure in New York State. Before licensure, our candidate was someone who had studied psychoanalysis or had been in an analysis. This person already loved the subject and we still welcome them at our Open Houses. However, there is a new kind of candidate who is interested in career change and seeks the license. It is up to us then to engage this person in the study of psychoanalysis so that they come to love it too. What kind of training program will make them want to come and stay? How do we help candidates find their voices amid proliferating theories? Dr. Zimmermann invited us to suspend our beliefs about training and open our minds to how it might be in the 21st century.

Dr. Zimmermann noted “significant ad hoc modifications” in the training program since our inception 70 years ago. We are not now entirely free to choose how to train candidates with the advent of licensure in New York State. Before licensure, our candidate was someone who had studied psychoanalysis or had been in an analysis. This person already loved the subject and we still welcome them at our Open Houses. However, there is a new kind of candidate who is interested in career change and seeks the license. It is up to us then to engage this person in the study of psychoanalysis so that they come to love it too. What kind of training program will make them want to come and stay? How do we help candidates find their voices amid proliferating theories? Dr. Zimmermann invited us to suspend our beliefs about training and open our minds to how it might be in the 21st century.

Dr. Zimmermann noted “significant ad hoc modifications” in the training program since our inception 70 years ago. We are not now entirely free to choose how to train candidates with the advent of licensure in New York State. Before licensure, our candidate was someone who had studied psychoanalysis or had been in an analysis. This person already loved the subject and we still welcome them at our Open Houses. However, there is a new kind of candidate who is interested in career change and seeks the license. It is up to us then to engage this person in the study of psychoanalysis so that they come to love it too. What kind of training program will make them want to come and stay? How do we help candidates find their voices amid proliferating theories? Dr. Zimmermann invited us to suspend our beliefs about training and open our minds to how it might be in the 21st century.