Select Page

NPAP Institute Courses

NPAP INSTITUTE – Courses and Workshops
Location: 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011

==================================================================================================
GUIDE:
6-week courses meet for 90 minutes each, total 9 contact hours
12-week courses meet for 90 minutes each, total 18 contact hours
Fall Term: September – December; Winter Term: January-February; Spring Term: March-May; Summer Term: June-July
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 PM or 9:00 – 10:30 PM weekly Monday-Thursday.
==================================================================================================

The National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0139. =================================================================================================

National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0010.

==================================================================================================

R600A: Essential Concepts of Freud (12 sessions) – Isolde Keilhofer, Ben Marinucci, 18 contact hours

The overall conceptual framework of Freud’s early psychoanalytic theory and emphasis – “to understand the mind and how it works” – as reflected in the sequence of his early writings from 1895 through 1922. In his early view there are “real events and actual causes that produce neurotic symptoms….” He introduced the concept of undischarged tension to explain psychological neuroses. Early treatment was focused on the attempt to bring hidden, pathological memories back into awareness. The concepts explored in this course include childhood sexuality, primary and secondary process, repression, resistance, symptom formation, and defenses.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe Freud’s theory of childhood sexuality.
– Identify primary and secondary process.
– Describe Freud’s theory of defenses including repression, resistance, and symptom formation.
– Describe Freud’s topographical theory of mind.

 R600B: Development of Psychoanalytic Thought – Ed Levy, Montana Katz, 18 contact hours

The Seminar is an introduction to theoretical developments and changes in the analytic world, starting with and related to, Freud’s original and massive contributions. Following a brief overview of Freud’s early theories of the mind the Seminar reviews the diversity and integration of later analytic theorists who add to Freud’s work, leading to a contemporary Freudian perspective on analytic theory and technique. The theorists touched on include the contributions of Ferenczi, the Ego Psychologists (Anna Freud and Heinz Hartmann), Melanie Klein, Harry Stack Sullivan, Kohut, the British theorists (Fairbairn, Winnicott and Balint), and the work of Hans Loewald. The Seminar also touches on implications for technique related to the later theoretical developments.

After attending the class, participants will be able to
– Discuss the theoretical changes that occurred in the analytic world through viewing the works of theorists that followed Freud.
– Describe the implications that theoretical developments have on technique.
– Define Melanie Klein’s paranoid schizoid and depressive positions and their implications for treatment.
– Define Kohut’s theory of selfobjects (such as mirroring, idealizing, twinship) and its influence on technique.
– Describe Anna Freud’s contribution of “the ego and the mechanisms of defense,” and their relevance to treatment.
– Define Winnicottian concepts, such as transitional space, transitional object, the holding environment, and use the object.

 R Freud 1: Essential Concepts of Freud 2 – Tom Taylor, Alan Barnett, 9 contact hours

Freud’s theoretical contributions from 1923 to 1940 include the Structural theory – the meaning of the concepts of ego, superego and the id – and the centrality of the Oedipus complex which he describes as “… the most significant experience of childhood development.” The revision and development of Freud’s theory gives rise to concepts of unconscious guilt, negative therapeutic reaction, resistances of the ego, signal anxiety and hidden, unconscious defenses to contain anxiety.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe Freud’s Structural Theory of the mind.
– Describe Freud’s theory of anxiety.
– Identify unconscious defenses including negative therapeutic reaction and resistances of the ego.

 R Freud 2: Freud Seminar 2 (6 sessions) – Tom Taylor, 9 contact hours

This course will take up Freud’s technique papers in chronological order so that they follow the major shifts in his thought. Also included will be readings that illustrate the evolution of Freudian technique into what is in use in the clinic today, such as APA (6th ed), Ellman, S.J. (1991) Freud’s Technique Papers: A contemporary perspective. Northvale, NJ: Aronson.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe the evolution of Freud’s technique from 1895 to 1940.
– Discuss Freudian technique as it is used in the clinic today.

 R603: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development I – Brian Kloppenberg, Hope Igleheart, 18 contact hours

An exploration of normal and pathological development from infancy through the pre-Oedipal and Oedipal periods, The central tasks and conflicts of Freudian Theory, Object Relations, and Self Psychology will be presented, as well as recent contributions from Attachment Theory and Infant Observation.

After attending this course, participants will be able to:
– Define the unique contribution of psychoanalysis to the theory of human development over the first six years of life through a close reading of texts from Freud to more recent contributions.
– Compare different trends in psychoanalytic developmental theory in terms of various historical and conceptual shifts, including Freud’s initial discoveries, the contributions of Object Relations theory, Ego Psychology, and Self Psychology.
– Describe more recent contributions, such as Attachment Theory and Infant Observation.

 R604: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development II – Hope Igleheart, Ruth Rosenbaum, 18 contact hours

The discussion of normal and pathological development in latency, pre-adolescence, adolescence and adulthood. Clinical material will be presented demonstrating this period of development.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Differentiate normal from pathological development in children, adolescents, and adults.
– Examine pathological developments in adulthood.
– Explain theories that address the treatment of disorders at different stages of development.

 R605: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis I – Paul Kaiser, Judy Ann Kaplan, 18 contact hours

The psychoanalytic theory of anxiety states, hysterias, obsessions, and depression will be examined. The course introduces the mechanisms and features of symptom formation and character development. The course also discusses the determination of psychic structures by ego and superego functioning, the drive-defense conflict model, the structural deficit model, and other models. Diagnostic considerations are conceptualized and are used to understand the implications of patients’ material and enactments, particularly in regard to the timing and formulation of interventions.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Identify, distinguish and classify patients’ verbal and non-verbal productions within the diagnostic categories.
– Assess and assign levels of pathology within a specific category
– Explain how a particular classification leads to differential treatment techniques.
– Demonstrate their ability to apply these concepts in a clinical presentation.

 R606: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis II – Douglas Maxwell, 18 contact hours

Diagnosis II emphasizes the continuities and differences in psychic structure for character disorders, perversions, and narcissistic, borderline, and psychotic organizations. As in R605, diagnostic considerations are conceptualized and are used to understand the implications of patients’ material and enactments, particularly in regard to the timing and formulation of interventions.

After attending this class, students will be able to:
– Identify the multiple factors that are essential in formulating a psychoanalytic diagnosis.
– Distinguish and classify patients as to their functioning level (neurotic, borderline or psychotic).
– Identify particular techniques and strategies that are effective with different diagnostic categories.

 R607: Analysis of Resistance – Penny Rosen, Leah Jacobs, 18 contact hours

The resistance seminar studies Freud’s contributions to the analysis of resistance; the role of psychic structures; character; multiple theories of resistance including object relations, self-psychology and ego psychology; manifestations of resistances and methods of working therapeutically with resistances. Clinical presentations are integrated with readings.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define Freud’s concept of resistance in relation to aggression and erotic transference.
– Describe the contributions of various theories to the concept of resistance.
– Discuss concepts of character resistance; empathic failure; and Freud’s paper on “repeating, remembering and working through.”
– Identify treatment techniques applied to address resistance.

 R609: Introduction to Dream Interpretation – James Rubins, Roman Crudele, 18 contact hours

An intensive study of Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams. Using this book and updating it where appropriate, this course will focus on techniques of dream interpretation and on the topographic theory of dream construction as conceptualized in the text.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe the unconscious processes of dreams, including day residue and condensation; dreams seen as wish fulfilment or anxiety; dreams seen a self-state dreams.
– Discuss Freud’s technique of interpretation of dreams.
– Identify the transference in dreams as latent material.
– Identify techniques used for dream interpretation.

 R610: Psychopharmacology and Psychoanalysis (6 sessions) – Scott Palyo, 9 contact hours

Many psychoanalytic patients require and are using psychoactive medication for relief of symptoms and to enhance their talk therapy. This course deals with the unconscious psychodynamics involved in medication use, including resistance, compliance, transference, countertransference, and the meaning
of transitional phenomena. Socio-cultural factors will also be reviewed. Students learn how to clarify the diagnosis based on DSM criteria and how to collaborate with the psychiatrist. Medications targeting various symptoms will be discussed for different age groups.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe resistance, compliance, transference, countertransference as it relates to the use of medication.
– Describe the socio-cultural factors that influence attitudes towards medication.
– Review medications that are used for specific symptoms.
– Elucidate how collaboration with psychiatrists can advance or hinder treatment.
– Discuss the benefit of using the DSM criteria for diagnostic purposes when considering medication.

 R660A: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions) – Jane Kupersmidt, Deborah Keith, 9 contact hours

 R660: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions) – Jane Kupersmidt, Neil Herlands, 9 contact hours

Participants are offered an opportunity to hear psychoanalysts present cases and participate in collegial discussions. The Guest Analysts course also provides a model for future Case Presentation.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the clinical case in terms of transference and countertransference.
– Describe the technique used to interpret resistance in the case.
– Describe the unconscious material as manifested in the patient’s dream.

 R665: Professional Ethics in Psychoanalytic Practice  – Merle Molofsky, Claire Steinberger, 18 contact hours

The ethics course addresses the dilemmas commonly encountered in clinical practice concerning boundaries and boundary violations, confidentiality, competence, illness, exploitation, relationship with colleagues, and other related topics. Discussions will be based on material brought in by the participants and on sources from professional handbooks and legal and regulatory guidelines, as well as a compilation of fictitious cases illustrating the many ethical dilemmas confronting clinicians.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the regulations concerning boundary violations, its implications for treatment, and the steps a therapist can take for consultation when at risk for boundary violations.
– Discuss the privacy rights of patients and the necessary cautions needed in regards to confidentiality, including when presenting or writing clinical material for publication.
– Explain how colleagues can take measures to protect patients when a therapist’s health is failing.
– Describe the parameters of treatment that are set up to protect the patient/therapist relationship as itrelates to boundaries.

 IPT: Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique – James Holmes, Sherman Pheiffer, Art Pomponio, Sarina Meones, Sue Mitchell , 18 contact hours

This course deals with engaging the patient in the analytic treatment and putting into process the structures of treatment. It starts from the point of entering treatment, the initial interview, establishing a therapeutic alliance and frame and understanding the nature of the patient’s and therapist’s conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe initial contacts with the patient, including first contacts via phone, email or other means, first in-person meetings.
– Describe ways of investigating the patient’s stated reasons for entering therapy.
– Discuss clarifying with the patient whether to begin to work together.
– Describe establishing a therapeutic frame, including frequency and fee.
– Discuss issues of boundaries in psychoanalytic practice.
– Describe clinical manifestations of some fundamental psychoanalytic concepts, including transference, countertransference, resistance and unconscious process.
– Describe risk assessment for harm to self and others
– Describe steps for handling crisis situations in clinical practice
– Identify and describe essential legal and ethical issues as they pertain to psychoanalytic practice, including boundaries of confidentiality in the clinical setting, confidentiality issues according to HIPAA
requirements for appropriate record keeping for the candidate’s specific license

 RPT1: Psychoanalytic Technique I – Ruth Oscharoff, Linda Washburn, Dru Orenstein, 18 contact hours

This course focuses on the use of psychoanalytic concepts in clinical work and is based on candidates’ cases. Listening analytically, understanding unconscious communications and engaging patients in the treatment process are some of the areas addressed. Candidates should have patients to discuss.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define unconscious communication in relation to transference and countertransference.
– Describe what constitutes the therapeutic alliance for treatment to begin.
– Explain how non-verbal communication is addressed in treatment.
– Examine resistance as part of the therapeutic working through process.
– Discuss how parameters, including time frame, serve the treatment.

 RPT2: Psychoanalytic Technique II – Paul Cooper, Sue Sawyer, Dru Orenstein, 18 contact hours

This course covers the practical and technical aspects of psychoanalytic treatment, from various theoretical perspectives, as candidates continue to develop their professional analytic selves. Class participants introduce issues and problems from their own clinical experiences, and discuss weekly required readings as they relate to such topics as: beginning treatment, treatment dynamics, conscious and unconscious processes, transference and countertransference dynamics and basic management issues.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define transference, countertransference, resistance and dream interpretation from various theoretical perspectives.
– Examine the psychodynamics of the patient/therapist relationship in terms of the transference, manifestations of childhood relationships.
– Describe interventions to engage a patient at the beginning of treatment.

 R703: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications Of Ego Psychology/Structural Theory –Carl Jacobs, James Rubins, Jerry Nashban, 18 contact hours

This course begins with the historical perspective of the four phases of Ego Psychology and Structural Theory, studying the works of Hartmann, Spitz, Anna Freud and others. It then proceeds to the evolved contemporary mainstream work of Gray, Busch, et al. “Ego Psychology” is a psychoanalytic
developmental object relations theory that now encompasses aspects of drive and structure, as well as internalized object relations, and its implications for therapeutic action.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the contributions made in Ego Psychology by theorists including Hartmann, Spitz, Anna Freud.
– Describe the contemporary contributions made by Gray and Busch to Ego Psychology.
– Discuss “Ego Psychology” as an object relations theory.
– Define ego defenses that are the cornerstone of Anna Freud’s theory.

 R704: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Object Relations – Jeff Werden, Richard Karpe, 18 contact hours

Introduction to the British Object Relations theorists, including the works of Fairbairn, Balint, Guntrip, and Winnicott. The object relations model is distinguished from the classical intrapsychic model through clinical case material illustrating interpretations drawn from both theoretical models.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the contributions of Fairbairn, Balint, Guntrip and Winnicott.
– Illustrate how Object Relations theory differs from classical theory.
– Demonstrate how interpretations in Object Relations theory may vary from structural theory.
– Describe a technique in Object Relations theory that may advance treatment.

 R705: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Self Psychology/Intersubjective Theory – Alan Dolber, Peter Zimmerman, 18 hours

Reviews the evolution of Self Psychology within psychoanalysis, developing basic concepts such as selfobject transferences, empathic introspective mode of listening and a redefinition of narcissism. This course will explore contemporary developments in self psychology, in particular the theory of Intersubjectivity, and examine how the theory fits into the relational perspective in psychoanalysis.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Identify the selfobject transferences.
– Discuss the redefinition of narcissism.
– Define empathic introspective mode of listening.
– Describe the tenets of Intersubjectivity and its concurrence with relational theory.

 R706: Psychoanalytic Theory, Diagnosis and Treatment of Borderline Pathology – Stephanie Teitelbaum, Alice Entin, 18 contact hours

A study of the aetiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment of the borderline patient. Characteristic defenses, such as slitting and projective identification are discussed in relation to the unique transferences, resistances and countertransferences associated with borderline conditions. Readings include the theoretical views of Kernberg, Kohut, Giovacchini, Searles, Fonagy, Bromberg and attachment theorists.

After completing the course, participants will be able to
– Describe theories of the causes of borderline disorders.
– Describe the theories differentiating borderline states from borderline personality organization.
– Identify and differentiate psychotic and non-psychotic defenses in borderline patients.
– Explain differences and similarities in psychoanalytic technique applied to psychotic and non-psychotic defenses.
– Explain the theoretical rationale for differences in psychoanalytic technique applied to psychotic defenses.

 R708: Analysis of Transference and Countertransference – Alan Roland, Neil Herlands, 18 contact hours

From both historical and differing clinical perspectives, this course explores the contributions that both the analyst and the analysand bring to the transference situation. Topics such as transference neurosis, therapeutic alliance, varieties of transference and countertransference, the role of cultural factors, and relevant techniques for working with transference will be addressed. Clinical presentations will be integrated with theoretical considerations.

After attending the class, participants will be able to:
– Define transference and countertransference from differing theoretical positions.
– Explicate detailed examples of how to compare and contrast these concepts in clinical terms.
– Demonstrate understanding of clinical technique as it relates to these theoretical distinctions.

 R710: Psychoanalytic Research Methodology – James Holmes, Pat Precin, 18 contact hours

The research course is designed as an introduction to the literature and methods of empirical psychoanalytic research. The course will focus upon research approaches to issues confronting psychoanalysis both as an approach to understanding mind and as clinical practice. Psychoanalytic research deals with affirming the validity of the discipline of psychoanalysis and can be divided into four domains: outcome research, process research, developmental psychoanalytic research, and conceptual research.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Describe the importance of empirical research to the viability of psychoanalysis.
– Describe the role of empirical research in the development and substantiation of psychoanalytic theory.
– Describe some of the current research validating the efficacy of psychoanalysis.
– Distinguish between psychoanalytic knowledge that is empirically-based and that which is speculative or based on untested hypotheses.
– Describe ethical considerations and human subject’s protections as they affect research in psychoanalysis.
– Describe the four domains of psychoanalytic research: outcome, process, developmental, and conceptual research.
– Demonstrate methods in reading, understanding, and evaluating psychoanalytic research.
– Demonstrate familiarity with basic research terminology
– Describe some useful research resources.

 R718: Sociocultural Influence on Development and Psychopathology – Catherine Silver, Alan Roland , 18 contact hours

This course delves into the effects of sociocultural factors derived from ethnicity, nationality, race, class, and gender on configurations of the self, early development, and the salience of certain kinds of psychopathology. It further covers treatment issues involving resistance, transference, countertransference, modes of communication, and the structuring of the psychoanalytic relationship as these vary among patients from diverse cultures.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Describe the effects of sociocultural factors on the self and early development.
– Discuss the salience of psychopathology originating from sociocultural factors.
– Explain how patients of diverse cultures affect the transference and countertransference.
– Describe if resistance manifests differently when patient and therapist are of diverse cultures.

 RPT3: Psychoanalytic Technique III – Montana Katz, Loveleen Posmentier, 18 contact hours

Case Seminar is intended to provide the clinical experience for RPT4 and PRT5. Clinical implications of multiple perspectives in psychoanalysis, along with developmental considerations in conceptualizing a therapeutic stance, will be discussed. The class discussions and assigned readings will be integrated with the candidates’ case presentations.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Conceptualize a perspective or multiple perspectives in psychoanalysis that are applicable to a clinical case, utilizing one or more theoretical orientation.
– Apply developmental theory when developing a theoretical stance to a clinical case.
– Address the implication of using multiple theoretical perspectives in psychoanalysis to a clinical case.
– Examine the unconscious phenomena as manifested in transference and countertransference, when analyzing a clinical case.

 RPT4: Psychoanalytic Technique IV – Paul Cooper, Ed Levy, Sherman Pheiffer, 18 contact hours

This course utilizes candidate cases to introduce the structure of the psychoanalytic situation and the beginning phase of treatment. Topics include comparisons between psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, manifestations of transference, transference neurosis and resistance, free association and the use of the couch, the therapeutic alliance and acting-out.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Examine the beginning phase of treatment.
– Compare the focus of psychoanalysis to psychotherapy.
– Describe transference, transference neurosis, and resistance, as seen in clinical material
– Define the concepts of free association, therapeutic alliance, and acting out.
– Discuss the use of the couch in psychoanalytic treatment.

 RPT5: Psychoanalytic Technique V – Ruth Oscharoff, Jane Kupersmidt, Paul Cooper, 18 contact hours

This course will address the application of the processes studied in RPT4 to the difficult patient, the borderline and narcissistic individual–and differentiates between the opening, middle, and termination phases of treatment. Multiple theoretical points of view are considered in formulating a therapeutic stance and the varied bases for analytic technique. Concepts such as analyzability, the use of self, and the ability to symbolize are studied, along with their impact on the analytic process and on countertransference. Candidate case material is used to illustrate and provide clinical focus for discussion.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Define analyzability, the use of self, and the ability to symbolize as it pertains to clinical work.
– Discuss the opening, middle, and termination phases of treatment as it pertains to the difficult patient.
– Examine the psychoanalytic processes as it pertains to the borderline and narcissistic individual.
– Formulate a therapeutic stance after considering multiple theoretical points of view.

 R760: Case Presentation by Guest Analyst (6 sessions) – Jane Kupersmidt, Neil Herlands, 9 contact hours

Participants are offered an opportunity to hear psychoanalysts present cases and participate in collegial discussions. The Guest Analysts course also provides a model for future Case Presentation.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the clinical case in terms of transference and countertransference.
– Describe the technique used to interpret resistance in the case.
– Describe the unconscious material as manifested in the patient’s dream.

 R801: Case Presentation by Student Analysts I – Joan Klein, 18 contact hours

In a workshop format, participants learn the method to conceptualize the structure of a psychoanalytic case. The course explores the creation of a clinical narrative, the participant’s role in the narrative, and theoretical conceptualizations of the unfolding narrative. Special emphasis will be placed on how to make the treatment presentation come alive.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Demonstrate a clinical narrative that incorporates theoretical conceptualizations in a psychoanalytic case.
– Discuss the transference, countertransference, resistance analysis, and interpretation of dreams when developing a clinical narrative.
– Illustrate the role of the therapist in developing the clinical narrative.

 R802: Case Presentation by Student Analysts II – Sherman Pheiffer, 18 contact hours

This seminar prepares participants for professional clinical presentations. It focuses on the organization, presentation, and theoretical discussion of ongoing psychoanalytic treatment. Participants take turns presenting cases. The instructor assigns readings relevant to the application of psychoanalytic theory to the understanding of personality problems and their treatment.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Apply psychoanalytic theory to the understanding of personality problems and their treatment in a clinical case.
– Illustrate concepts of transference, countertransference, resistance, and dream-work in a clinical case.
– Discuss theoretical concepts of transference, countertransference, resistance, and dream interpretation, in developing a clinical case presentation.
– Demonstrate the principles of organizing a clinical case presentation.

 R803: Relational Psychoanalysis – Montana Katz, 18 contact hours

A comprehensive overview of the Relational School of psychoanalysis will be presented. Special focus will be given to the works of Stephen Mitchell, Robert Stolorow, Lewis Aron, and Irwin Hoffman. Topics such as social constructivism, intersubjectivity, and the problem of gender are emphasized. The broad implications of a relational approach to analytic practice will be examined; particularly the changes in the way analysts think about and work with countertransference.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Describe the theories of “social constructivism” and “intersubjectivity.”
– Explain the theories related to gender in contemporary theory.
– Examine the relational theory’s view of countertransference.
– Discuss the main theoretical contributions of Mitchell, Stolorow, Aron and Hoffman.

 R804: History of Psychoanalytic Thought – Aleksandra Wagner, Victoria Malkin, 18 contact hours

What is termed “psychoanalytic thought” will be considered as a form of thinking that corresponds to the conceptual and institutional development of psychoanalytic, as well as scientific and cultural (national) communities. Each session has its historical and geographical focus, while highlighting the unconscious: regression; dissent; vexed relationship between psychoanalysis and science; feminism and psychoanalysis; a notion of “national tradition”; epistemological position of “case history” psychoanalysts’ formation; conceptualizations of subjectivity and of psychoanalytic interaction; conceptualizations of cure; empathy; views others have had of psychoanalysis as a field of inquiry/ an ethical obligation to oneself/ an “impossible profession; modes (genres) of recording a history of
psychoanalysis; some of the archives where our history can be gleaned in more detail.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe a historical framework for an understanding of the development of psychoanalysis as a theory and practice.
– Explain the connections between different theories and persons whose work has shaped the psychoanalytic project.

 R807: Continuous Case Seminar – Rush Oscharoff, 18 contact hours

Case material of a patient currently in treatment with a seminar member will be presented for ongoing detailed follow-up and discussion. The patient will be selected on the basis of usefulness for delineating transference-countertransference issues, dynamics, and aspects of technique. The aim is to help participants integrate theoretical knowledge with clinical understanding in making technical interventions and interpretations. Specific interests of the participants will be addressed along with relevant readings.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe their analytic patients through the integration of theoretical knowledge, clinical understanding, and technical skill.
– Describe hearing/seeing/sensing unconscious processes and the implications of theoretical perspectives for clinical work.
– Identify the clinical processes of participants’ selected cases.

 R809: Advanced Dream Analysis – Montana Katz, Fred Feirstein, Anne Cutler, 18 contact hours

Advanced Dream Analysis focuses on post-Freudian contributions to the analysis of dreams. Theory and technique are explored from different psychoanalytic perspectives. Topics covered include: contemporary emphasis on the manifest content, the primary process, and the dream context. In addition, self-state dreams, the implications of REM dream research, and initial dreams will be studied. Candidate presentations are integrated with the theoretical readings.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
– Explain contemporary emphasis on the manifest content, the primary process, and the dream context.
– Discuss self-state dreams, and initial dreams.
– Describe the implications of REM dream research.
– Illustrate dream interpretation from different psychoanalytic perspectives.

 R860: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions) – Jane Kupersmidt, Neil Herlands, 9 contact hours

Candidates are offered an opportunity to hear psychoanalysts present cases and participate in collegial discussions. The Guest Analysts course also provides a model for future Case Presentation.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the clinical case in terms of transference and countertransference.
– Describe the technique used to interpret resistance in the case.
– Describe the unconscious material as manifested in the patient’s dream.

 R Freud 3: Freud Seminar 3 (6 sessions) – Jerold Nashban, 9 contact hours

In this course, Freud’s great clinical literary masterpieces will be reviewed for their usefulness in understanding the theoretical issues occupying Freud at the time of their composition. The clinical issues of these cases will be discussed for their significance to analytic technique. The famous cases of Little Hans, Anna O, Dora, the Rat Man, the Wolf Man, and the Schreber case will be studied. The course will revisit the movement from the Topographic to Structural Theory.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe Freud’s six famous cases and the significant clinical issues of each.
– Describe Freud’s move from the Topographic to Structural Theory in terms of these six cases.

 E803-A The Fundamentals of Lacanian Clinical Technique – James Holmes, 9 contact hours

October 18, 2015 and October 25, 2015. 4 ½ hours per meeting; Total contact hours = 9 hours
Using readings, the goals of psychoanalysis and analytic technique will be discussed from a Lacanian perspective. Discussion will focus on case formulation involving diagnosis and technique. Bruce Fink’s work will be featured.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe a Lacanian approach to listening, involving “free-floating” instead of “me-centered” attention, and with an ear more to what does not make sense than to what does.
– Discuss Lacan’s distinction between the imaginary and the symbolic, as it plays a role in minute-byminute clinical work and in diagnosis.
– Explain through clinical examples what it means to follow and punctuate a patient’s speech “to the letter.”
– Define the goals of Lacanian interpretation.
– Explain the distinction between the imaginary transference and the symbolic transference.

 E803 Difficult Patients – Nancy McWilliams,  9 contact hours

January 15, 22 – 2017. Time: 10 am – 3:30 pm. 4 ½ hours per meeting
This course will cover the treatment “difficult” patients as such patients have been conceptualized over psychoanalytic history. The main areas to be covered will be severe personality disorders, psychotic conditions, the narcissistic-psychopathic continuum, and the schizoid-paranoid continuum. The emphasis will be on the clinical challenges presented by people conceptualizable in these ways and on increasing one’s effectiveness with such patients.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Differentiate between understanding personality in terms of traits, even conceived dimensionally, versus in terms of intersubjective themes.
– Identify nuanced formulation of the psychologies of their individual patients, especially those who present significant difficulties.
– Explain some clinical implications of construing a patient as functioning at the borderline level of personality organization.
– Discuss some clinical implications of theorizing a psychotic level of personality organization.

 E803-C Psychosexuality, Intersectional: Freud’s Polymorphous Perversity, Laplanche’s Enigma – Avgi Saketopoulou, 9 contact hours

Meets 6 Wednesdays, September 13 – October 18, 2017, 4:00 – 5:30 pm
This course provides a theoretical foundation on the centrality of infantile sexuality in our psychic constitution and examines how sexuality is always already refracted through culture. In a rigorous metapsychological manner it moves through questions of how we become sexual beings, what ‘counts’ as a legitimate erogenous zone and what categories of difference (class, race, ability, gender, etc.) have to do with the sexual. Further, it seeks to account for how institutional systems of oppression (patriarchy, sexism and racism) write themselves into the ‘truth’ of sexuality, shaping the arc of desire, fantasy and inhibition. Brief clinical examples help link theoretical material to the consulting room.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Explain the centrality of how infantile sexuality informs human sexuality and the constitution of the subject.
– Describe how culture permeates, definitionally and from the start, the formation as well as the manifestation of the sexual.

 E805 Gender Development: Psychoanalytic Theory of Male and Female Development  – Victoria Mills, Robert Benton, 18 contact hours

The course reviews traditional theories of male and female development and re-examines these in the light of contemporary gender theory.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the fluidity of gender identification.
– Describe the contributions of neuroscience in understanding gender development.
– Examine the traditional theories of male and female development in light of contemporary gender theory.

 E809: Psychoanalytic Theory of Psychosis – Mike Eigen, 18 contact hours

Explores psychotic organization as conceptualized by theorists such as Freud, Federn, Klein, Bion, Winnicott, Elkin, Green, and Grotstein. The relevance of psychotic dynamics for various “disorders of self” (e.g., borderline, narcissistic, schizoid) is discussed. The main focus is on psychotic patterns and psychoanalytic ways of presenting and understanding them. The central question for the course is “What can psychosis tell us about psychoanalysis, and psychoanalysis about psychosis?”

After attending the seminar, participants will be able to:
– Identify forms of psychoses and work with psychotic dynamics.
– Identify and work with psychotic dynamics in non-psychotic as well as psychotic patients, insofar as psychotic elements are present and impede development and functioning.

 E813: Seminar on Masochism – Joyce Rosenberg, 18 contact hours

Readings and clinical material highlight the psychoanalytic understanding of the development and place of masochism in personality and psychopathology. Classes will start with an overview of masochism and sadomasochism and move on to an examination of some of the issues analysts face in working with the
masochism, including: The treatment of patients with narcissistic/masochistic personalities, the negative therapeutic reaction and the treatment of patients who harm themselves or have eating disorders.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define the development and place of masochism in personality and psychopathology.
– Discuss the concept of negative therapeutic reaction in relation to clinical material.
– Discuss treatment methods of narcissistic/masochistic personalities
– Describe methods of treating those who are self-harming and have eating disorder.

 E814: Contemporary Development in Kleinian Theory and Technique – Maggie Brenner, 18 contact hours

Clinical application of Kleinian concepts to the psychoanalytic process will be discussed in relation to the works of Betty Joseph, Edna O’Shaughnessy, Hanna Segal, and other contemporary Kleinians.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss Kleinian concepts including the schizoid and depressive positions.
– Apply Kleinian theory to clinical psychoanalytic process.
– Describe the main contributions of contemporary Kleinians including Betty Joseph, Edna O’Shaughnessy, and Hanna Segal.

 E816: Narcissism – Lee Minoff, 18 contact hours

The issue of narcissism is examined with a focus on theoretical considerations and clinical cases. Among the theorists studied will be Sigmund Freud, Heinz Kohut, Otto Kernberg, and Bela Grunberger. The seminar is aimed at helping the student understand the concept of narcissism from several different theoretical perspectives and the various implications for technique.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the contributions of Freud, Kohut, Kernberg, and Grunberger as it pertains to the concept narcissism.
– Examine the concept of narcissism, manifested in clinical material, and its implications for technique.

 E817: Advanced Seminar on Character Analysis and Treatment of the Character Disorders –Judith Newman, 18 contact hours

The seminar on character analysis focuses on character and character traits as viewed from various theoretical perspectives. Course topics include: th development of character; fantasy, as it contributes to character; differential diagnosis and treatment implications. Also discussed are the implications of the analyst’s character on treatment. The usefulness of the concept of character is highlighted in working with resistance, transference, and countertransference.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of character when working with resistance, transference, and countertransference.
– Discuss character analysis from various theoretical perspectives.
– Explain the development of character, and fantasy as it contributes to character.
– Describe differential diagnosis and treatment implications of character and character traits.
– Examine the implications of the therapist’s character on treatment.

 E825: Seminar on Symbolization and Creativity – Fred Feirstein, 18 contact hours

The seminar focuses on symbolization in primary and secondary process thinking as manifested in dreams, metaphors, fantasies, and creativity.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe the manifestation of primary and secondary process thinking in dreams, and metaphors.
– Examine the manifestation of symbolization in fantasies and creativity.
– Discuss the implications of symbolization in clinical technique.

 E831: The Psychoanalytic Approach to Psychosomatic Pathology – Muriel Morris, 9 contact hours

Psychoanalysts have long known that early pathological object relations and psychic conflict contribute to the causation and maintenance of many physical symptoms and conditions for which medical treatments alone are often inadequate to effect improvement. Topics include early object relations and their regulatory function, family pathology, somatization as metaphor, alexithymia and resistance. Conditions covered will include neurasthenia and chronic fatigue syndrome, anorexia, colitis, infertility, impotence, eczema, asthma, and others. Case material and treatment techniques will be discussed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss early object relations and their regulatory function, psychic conflict, and family pathology, as they contribute to psychosomatic pathology.
– Describe the concepts of somatization as metaphor, alexithymia, and resistance.
– Examine treatment techniques that are applicable to psychosomatic conditions.

 E832: Inductions, Seductions: Through a Dark Mirror – Art Robbins, 18 contact hours

Participants explore the creative use of projective identifications, role inductions, and the technique of mirroring unconscious material. The class combines a participatory atmosphere and an emotional/cognitive integration of theory and technique.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Examine the use of projective identifications, role inductions, and the technique of mirroring unconscious material, as it pertains to psychoanalytic theory and technique.
– Describe the therapist’s emotional and cognitive state to the application of psychoanalytic technique.

 E833: Seminar on Depression – Peter Zimmerman, 18 contact hours

This course explores the clinical issues and theoretical perspectives involved in the psychoanalytic understanding and treatment of depression.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe a psychoanalytic technique applicable to the treatment of depression.
– Discuss clinical issues that arise when using psychoanalytic concepts in the treatment of depression.
– Examine the DSM diagnostic categorization and the contributions of the psychoanalytic perspective in the treatment of depression.

 E850: Fantasy and Unconscious Process – Jerry Nashban, 18 contact hours

Clinical applications of unconscious fantasy and its role in the organization of patients’ associations are reviewed. Among other topics, this seminar studies the way unconscious fantasy manifests itself in the session, the criteria for interpretation, the relation of unconscious fantasy to transference and countertransference, and the relation between unconscious fantasy and the patient’s actual life history. Readings from Arlow, Boesky, Grossman, and others.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the relation between the concept of unconscious fantasy and the patient’s actual life history.
– Describe the way unconscious fantasy manifests itself in the session and the criteria for interpretation.
– Examine the relation of unconscious fantasy to transference and countertransference.

 E864C: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis: Introduction to Bion – Mike Eigen, 18 contact hours

Selected concepts from W. R. Bion’s work will be explored as drawn from his writings on alpha function, beta elements, dream work, catastrophe, faith, knowledge, love hate, psychosis and the psychoanalytic attitude. The course covers Bion’s use of literature, mysticism, mathematics, mythology, and philosophy as integral parts of his psychoanalytic approach. How his life experiences fed his psychoanalytic vision, opening new kinds of experiencing, will also be explored.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe Bion’s concepts on alpha function, beta elements, and dream work.
– Describe Bion’s psychoanalytic formulations on faith, knowledge, love and hate.
– Discuss Bion’s psychoanalytic conceptualization on psychosis.
– Examine Bion’s psychoanalytic attitude and approach to treatment.

 E864D: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis: Introduction to Lacan – Richard Karpe, 18 contact hours

The purpose of this course is to present a basic understanding of Lacan’s concepts from clinical and theoretical perspectives. The course will place in the history of the psychoanalytic movement and describe his relationship with the International Psychoanalytic Association. Some of his most basic
formulations will be illustrated with clinical examples from Freud’s cases analyzed by Lacan and from the instructor’s and candidates’ own clinical cases.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss Lacan’s basic clinical and theoretical concepts.
– Examine an example of Lacan’s interpretation of one of Freud’s cases.
– Describe Lacan’s placement in the history of the psychoanalytic movement.

 E866: Lesbians in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice – Beverley Goff, 18 contact hours

The course is designed for analytic candidates who work with lesbians and who desire a deeper understanding of the clinical differences between lesbian and heterosexual women. Theory, case studies, and the writings of lesbian and heterosexual analysts will be discussed.

– State how a psychoanalytic treatment of a homosexual woman must take into consideration the heteronormative, homophobic, and violently anti-homosexual world that women have grown up in.
– Describe how until recently the psychoanalytic treatment of a lesbian has been inherently pathologizing.
– Examine the recent developments in psychoanalytic theory and practice in the treatment of homosexuality, in light of historical events.
– Explain some of the conflicts and contradictions in Freud’s writings concerning homosexuality.
– Identify the clinical differences between lesbian and heterosexual women.

 E867: The Homosexual Male in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice – James Holmes, 9 contact hours

Dates/Time: 6 Thursdays, June – July 2017, 9:00 – 10:30 pm

The course is designed for analysts who are working with or who intend to work with homosexual males. Both theory and the clinical implications of working with homosexuality in men will be discussed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Describe how the psychoanalytic treatment of male homosexuality until very recently has been almost exclusively etiological and, therefore, inherently pathologizing.
– Describe what is meant by the statement that the psychoanalytic treatment of gay men should be no different than the psychoanalytic treatment of anybody else.
– Describe some of the features, developmental and otherwise, unique to gay men who grow up in an environment unequipped to recognize the particularities of gay men.
– State how a primary focus of any psychoanalytic treatment of a homosexual man must take into consideration the fact that that man has grown up in a heteronormative, homophobic and violently anti-homosexual world.

 E868: Seminar on Attachment Theory – Helen Goldberg, 18 contact hours

This course will introduce candidates to some of the major ideas offered by attachment theorists. Concepts such as attachment categories, secure base and reflective function will be studied with a view toward integrating this perspective into clinical psychoanalytic work.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define concepts of “reflective function” and “mentalization.”
– Describe attachment categories when applied to clinical material.
– Demonstrate how Attachment Theory is integrated in clinical psychoanalytic work.
– Explain implicit and explicit modes of communication and its application to clinical technique.
– Identify the attachment concepts of secure base and affect regulation in the clinical situation.

 E873: Psychoanalysis and Family/Couple Relationships – Claire Steinberger, 18 contact hours

This seminar, rooted in psychoanalytic inquiry, explores how psychoanalytic theory illuminates an appreciation of family (and couple) functioning. By examining major psychoanalytic models (including ego, object relations, self psychology and attachment theory), the course sheds light on the “bridge”
between psychoanalysis and significant “family-oriented” processes at individual, couple and child-infamily levels. The class augments psychoanalytic interest in child development, couple functioning, intergenerational transmission, and the role of the child vis-à-vis unconscious and conscious family projections and dynamics. Pertinent literary contributions will complement analytic contributions.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss the “bridge” between psychoanalysis and significant “family-oriented” processes.
– Describe the unconscious and conscious projections on couples and family dynamics.
– Explain how psychoanalytic theory and practice is applicable to the treatment of couples and family.
– Examine the concept of “intergenerational transmission” of trauma in family dynamics when treating couples and family.

 E882: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory of Trauma & Dissociation – Susan Tye, 18 contact hours

The dissociative model of the mind, interpersonal neurobiology, and attachment research offer congruent understandings and perspectives on the contemporary psychology of trauma. Aron, Bromberg, Howell, Schore, Siegel, Van der Kolk, Wallin and others consider multiple self-states, the implicit unconscious, and brain/mind/body aspects of PTSD. Clinical implications will be discussed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Discuss contemporary psychoanalytic theory of trauma, as it relates to dissociation, attachment research, and interpersonal neurobiology.
– Examine the concepts of multiple self-states, the implicit unconscious, and the brain/mind/body aspects of PTSD.
– Describe contemporary theory of trauma and its application to treatment technique.
=====================================================================================
NPAP INSTITUTE – COURSES
COSTS for Courses
$400 for a 12-session course and $200 for a 6-session course. A registration fee of $250 per year is due at the Fall registration; this includes a $10 library fee and a $30 fee for a subscription to the NPAP journal, The Psychoanalytic Review. Fees are subject to periodic review and change by the Board of Trustees of the Training Institute of NPAP. The yearly registration fees are nonrefundable and are required of all course attendees, whether they are taking courses each term or not, whether they have elected to take a year’s leave of absence or have been granted an extension of this absence.
Refunds for Courses – Professionals who are unable to attend a course for which they have registered may obtain a partial refund if they notify the Registrar in writing, no later than one week after the class has met. An administrative charge of $10 will be incurred.