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NPAP ASSOCIATION – Clinical and Scientific Programs, Study Groups, and Courses

Location: 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011

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COSTS for Clinical, Study Groups, and Scientific Programs:

NPAP members and students – No Cost; 90-minutes courses are $30 for non-members; 2-hour course are $40 for non-members.

Refunds for Clinical, Study Groups, and Scientific Programs – Professionals who are unable to attend a program for which they have registered may obtain a partial refund if they notify the Registrar in writing, no later than one week before the program. An administrative charge of $10 will be incurred.
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The National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0139.

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National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0010.

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• The Many Facets of a Psychoanalyst: Alan Roland
Alan Roland, Fred Feirstein, Nasir Ilahi, Art Robbins, Catherine Silver
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture
Meets: Sunday, June 11, 2017, 5:00-7:00 pm
Total = 2.0 CE Contact hours

For this Master Class, we celebrate and honor Alan Roland, a senior NPAP psychoanalyst who has contributed in his writings, teachings, presentations, conferences, and in his artistic expressions. Most dramatically, he stretched our boundaries in his cultural explorations and theoretical understanding of psychoanalysis in India and Japan. Our community and our profession has benefitted from his life lived as a psychoanalyst. Alan Roland will speak about psychoanalysis. The panelists will address different aspects of Roland’s career, particularly on how psychoanalysis influenced his artistic work and how the artistic form impacted his work as a psychoanalyst. intervention strategy (e.g., analytic containment, fantasy and metaphor and field interpretations).

After the presentation, participants will be able to
– Describe psychoanalytic principles such as transference and countertransference across cultures.
– Discuss the impact that psychoanalysis may have on the psychoanalyst as a creative artist and how one’s artistic work impacts the work of the psychoanalyst.

• Dances of Intimacy: Psychoanalysis and Couples
Claire Beth Steinberger, LP
Clinical Programs
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture/Workshop
Meets: Sundays: February 26, March 26, April 30 and June 4, 2017, 2:00 – 4:00pm
Total = 8 CE Contact hours

The series highlights significant contributions of psychoanalysis to family and couples therapy. The works of five experts are featured, exploring the mysteries — and quagmires — of couple relationships, while expanding the application of interpersonal dynamics to understanding individuals. Areas of focus include: (a) contemporary and post-modern models; (b) diagnosis and dynamics (e.g., multigenerational transmission, “birds of a feather” phenomenon, and narcissistic and traumatic attachment); and (c) intervention strategy (e.g., analytic containment, fantasy and metaphor and field interpretations).

After the presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify the psychoanalytic principles underlying unconscious dynamics in the couple, including the impact on individual insight and functioning.
– Evaluate the aspects of couple treatment that benefit individual growth and change.
– Compare psychoanalytic ideas in couple assessment and intervention strategy to those in individual psychotherapy.
– Describe techniques adapted for couples with narcissistic and traumatic struggles, expanding its relevance to individual therapeutic interventions.

• Disorganized Attachment: Implications for Psychoanalytic Work
Hope Igleheart, NPAP Faculty
Steve Yagerman, Chair, Scientific Program Committee
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture Lecture/Workshop
Date/Time: Wednesday, April 5, 2017 10:30am – 12:00pm
Total = 1.5 CE Contact hours

The presenter will be discussing a group of patients who fall into the “caregiver” category. Based on their memories and accounts of their early relationships with their mothers, she reasons that this particular group of patients corresponds with what attachment theorists classify as “insecure- disorganized” attachment. Their mothers appear to be helpless and fragile in the course of providing care to their child, particularly when the child is in distress. As a result, in later years the child becomes vigilant of, and solicitous to, the mother’s needs. Researchers term this “controlling-caretaking.” Interestingly, this group of children is most at risk for self-injury in adolescence.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to:
– Describe how psychoanalysts can identify the signs and consequences of an “insecure-disorganized” parent-child attachment.
– Identify how “controlling-caretaking” manifests itself in the development of children and adolescents and how one might best respond, therapeutically, to these youths who are at risk for self-injury.

• The Evocative, Enactive, and Lyric Narrative Modes of Clinical Prose: A Clinical Writing Workshop
Suzi Naiburg, PhD, LICSW (Presenter)
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair (Co-sponsor with MITO and NAAP)
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10012
Live in-person: Interactive Writing Workshop
Time/Date: April 23, 2017, 1:00 – 4:30pm
Total = 3.0 CE Contact hours

In this interactive, clinical writing workshop for new and experienced writers alike, Suzi Naiburg will introduce the principles of the evocative, enactive, and lyric modes of clinical prose, teaching by example, and invite participants to put what they learn immediately into practice in a series of short writing exercises.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to:
– Identify at least one principle of the evocative mode of clinical prose.
– Identify at least one principle of the enactive mode of clinical prose.
– Identify at least one principle of the lyric narrative mode of clinical prose

• Harnessing the Unconscious: Utilizing Expressive Modalities and Group Process in Clinical Supervision
Live Supervision by: Robert I. Wolf
Case Presenter: Michael O’Loughlin
Moderator: Judy Ann Kaplan
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: In person Lecture/Workshop
Date: Sunday, April 23, 2017, 6:00-7:30pm
Total = 1.5 CE Contact hours

Expressive Analysis combines elements of expressive modalities, such as art, movement, drama and music, and integrates them into a psychoanalytic framework to create a unique experience that fosters communication on a sensory motor level, promoting both creativity and insight. This workshop is designed to demonstrate how, within the format of group supervision, unconscious, sensory motor perceptions may be transformed into tangible, consciously perceived information that can then be used to inform and deepen the supervision experience. This supervision group will utilize various forms of expressive art modalities to elicit this sensory motor data.

After attending this presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify two types of sensory motor communication that may be used in clinical supervision
– Describe how these types of communication may be used in clinical supervision.

• Pain, Attitude, Multiplicity, Possibility
Michael Eigen, PhD
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture Lecture/Workshop
Date/Time: Friday, June 2, 2017, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
Total = 2 CE Contact hours

Various interactions between pain, attitude, and possibility will be traced. We learn from psychoanalysis that pain can be displaced. While some pains are focused and concentrated, others can be diffuse and hard to locate. Pain can radiate in many directions, at times permeate the psychic field, other times scarcely felt. Pain can help fuel creativity or lead to death. Bion writes of suffering joy, while Rilke writes of the terror of beauty. Eigen will read passages from his book, Under the Totem: In Search of a Path and discuss vicissitudes of pain and possibility. We will explore dimensions of experience that pain can open or close.

After the presentation, participants will be able to
– Describe the various roles pain can play in life and expand and refine their awareness of therapeutic possibilities in face of it.
– Explore the roles of varied therapeutic attitudes and their uses at different times, e.g., kinds of openness, receptivity, active suggestions, and background support.

• Clinical Programs
Workshops, Lectures, Presentations, Panels (with film, power point, videos)
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Penny Rosen, MSW, LCSW
Location: 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Time: Monthly programs from September – June on Sunday evenings from 5:30 pm -7:00 pm or 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm.
Frequency: Meets 9 x a year at 90 minutes each = 13.50 contact hours
Meets 1 x a year for two hours on Sunday evening from 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm or 5:30 pm –7:30 pm = 2.0 contact hours.
Total: 15.50 Contact hours (annually)

Clinical programs cover clinical practice and its application. Relevant theoretical models in the field will be explored, including Freudian theory, ego psychology, attachment theory, self psychology, Lacanian theory, object relations theory, relational theory, trauma theory, family therapy, and developmental theory. The course covers the use of clinical tools and/or approaches that extend clinical practice, such as the usage and ethics of modern technology in practice (e.g., Skype, the internet); neuropsychoanalysis and clinical practice; implications of research on clinical practice (e.g. evidence based, infant research, trauma research). In addition, attention will be given to ethics in clinical practice, spirituality in clinical practice, multicultural considerations in clinical practice (e.g., gender, sexuality). Clinical material that is presented covers technique of practice, including transference, countertransference, resistance analysis, defense analysis, and dream interpretation.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Examine the use of a tool or an approach that extends clinical practice, such as Skype, neuropsychoanalysis, trauma research, infant research.
– Describe how the unconscious is addressed in a specific theoretical model.
– Explain a way that transference and countertransference contribute to clinical practice.
– Describe how multicultural factors influence the dyadic relationship, the transference, countertransference, and resistance.
– Explicate how spirituality is viewed diagnostically and in terms of the dynamics of transference and countertransference.
– Identify ethical considerations as they pertain to modern technology and treatment.
– Define how infant research applies to adult treatment and practice.

• Supervision Course
Judy Ann Kaplan, MSW, LCSW, BCD-P
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Time: Course meets weekly on Wednesdays from 8:00 – 10:00 PM, 10 x a year, for 2 hours each = 20 contact hours
Total: 20 Contact hours

Readings on the topic of clinical supervision are discussed. Different supervisory styles and modalities are examined. Live supervision of a case presentation by a class member is followed by discussion of the supervisory technique.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Identify the responsibilities of the supervisor to the supervisee, the patient, the Institute, and the profession
– Delineate basic clinical issues in supervision including maintaining confidentiality, taking a history, handling issues of frequency and fees, keeping records, assessing and managing risk, and consulting with other professionals as appropriate
– Describe how the transference, countertransference, and enactments span all the relationships encountered in supervision: supervisor/supervisee; supervisee/patient; supervisor/patient; supervisor and supervisee/institute; supervisor and supervisee/profession
– Cite various legal and ethical issues as important to the supervisor and the supervision process

• Attachment Theory Study Group
Helen Goldberg, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Meets Fridays once a month from September – June from 2:00 – 3:30 PM
Meets 10 times a year, 90 minutes each time = 15 contact hours a year
Total = 15 Contact hours

The study seminar focuses on reading selected books and journal articles written by prominent attachment theorists and researchers. The similarities and divergences between attachment theory and other psychoanalytic theories are explored. Clinical case material is presented by participants and the facilitator to illustrate the manifestation of attachment concepts in clinical work.

After attending the seminar, participants will be able to:
– Articulate some basic concepts and techniques of attachment theory.
– Explain and apply therapeutic techniques of attachment theory to participant’s clinical practice.
– Define particular attachment styles of infancy and childhood.
– Identify how an attachment style of infancy may be repeated in the treatment dyad.
– Describe a therapeutic technique based on attachment theory that may address a disruption in treatment.
– Contrast treatment with a patient who exhibits a secure style of attachment to those presenting with an insecure style of attachment.
– Describe implicit and explicit communications in the treatment setting and how these styles of communication contribute to treatment techniques.

• Study Group on Aging
Rusty Horn, LP, NCPsyA, MS.Ed
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Time: Meets from September – July on Mondays, monthly from 8:30-10:00 pm, 11 x a year, 90 minutes per session = 16.50 contact hours per year.
Total: 16.50 Contact hours

Discussion is focused on current and historical readings on the subject of Aging. The group studies stages of adult development, how they impact the process of aging in the individual and in the intersection with the culture at large, and how to work psychoanalytically with this population. Case material that is presented amplifies the meanings of the readings as well as the usefulness of understanding the theory regarding psychoanalytically informed work with the later in life individual or couple.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Discuss how the mind and body interact with illness and how illness and bodily concerns of the later in life patient impact the psychotherapeutic treatment.
– Describe the psychotherapy technique with the cognitively impaired adult.
– Explain how psychotherapy for the later in life population contributes to the working through process of unresolved earlier conflicts and its manifestations in the transference and countertransference.
– Discuss the limitations of technology, medicine, and our bodies, the role of idealization and denigration of the physician, and the psychotherapeutic work concomitant with that understanding.
– Describe how narcissistic characters and those with narcissistic sensitivities can develop a more structured and supportive internal world to deal with dependency on others later in life.
– Describe the stages of adult development and how the tasks achieved at each stage can contribute to a healthier and more satisfying old age.

• Neuropsychoanalytic Clinical Study Group
Edith Laufer, PhD, Chair
Mary Edlow, MSW, LCSW, PhD
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, and films)

Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Dates/Times: Thursday, January 19, 2017, 4:00-600 pm; Friday, March 31, 2017, 3:30-5:30 pm (other dates to be determined).
Total: 2 hours per meeting, 10 CE hours per year

Clinical case Presentations: Presentations and discussions are focused on the psychodynamic treatment of patients who sustained focal brain lesions in different parts of the brain. The treatment approach focuses on the individual’s inner world — emotions, thoughts, and memories — both conscious and unconscious. The aim of the presentations is to show how to help brain injured patients adjust psychologically to their altered life circumstances.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify signs of transference in a non-verbal brain damaged person.
– Describe methods for establishing a psychoanalytic alliance and a holding environment with a brain damaged verbally-impaired patient.
– Discuss the role of mourning in the treatment of a brain-damaged patient.
– Discuss different methods of working with narcissistic manifestations that are due to brain lesions and/or brain damage or when it is a psychological constellation of the patient.

• The Neuropsychoanalytic Clinical Study Center’s Reading Group
Edith Laufer, PhD, Chair
Ann Rose Simon, LCSW
Susan Tye, LCSW
Aideen Nunan, LCSW
Mary Edlow, LCSW
Charlotte Kahn, EdD, LP
Walter Nieves, MD, Consulting Neurologist
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Date: Meets the first Friday of the month from October 2016 – June 2017, from 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Time: 9 x a year for 90 minutes (1.5 CE hour) each = 13.5 hours
Total: 13.5 CE Contact hours

The group will read, study, and discuss research from some of the seminal books and journals in neuropsychoanalysis and neuroscience. Foundational concepts at the juncture of neuroscience and psychoanalysis will be presented. Authors include Cozolino, Damasio, Panksepp and Biven, Kandel, Solms, and others. Clinical relevance will be explored.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Define mind as it differs from brain in neuropsychoanalytic research and writings.
– Explain how Damasio defines “self,” and how is “self” constructed in his writings.
– Discuss Panksepp’s research with rats and its application to the theory of emotions, including depression, anger, mourning, and joy.
– Discuss the new science of the mind as Kandel describes it and its importance to the future of psychoanalysis.
– Examine Solms’ approach to clinical treatment with brain-damaged patients, exploring the role of affect and the use of classical psychoanalytic parameters to treatment.

• Gender and Sexuality Study Group
Michael Spier, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Meets 10 times a year monthly on Fridays from 1:00 – 2:30 pm from September – June for 90 minutes each time = 15 hours annually
Total=15 contact hours

Discussions focus on books, articles and presentations by theorists and researchers on topics related to gender and sexuality. Clinical case material is presented to illustrate the relevance of the theory. The impact of new understandings of gender and sexuality on psychoanalytic theories and practice is explored.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Explain contemporary theories on gender and sexuality and the shifts in theory.
– Discuss the view that homosexuality was categorized as pathological and the diagnostic revisions that have occurred in the DSM.
– Examine the fluidity of gender and sexual identity.
– Describe whether treatment issues of homosexuals differ from heterosexual individuals.
– Explain the contributions of neuroscience to the understanding of gender.
– Discuss how homophobia can create obstacles to the treatment, as manifested in the transference/countertransference.

• Scientific Programs
Steve Yagerman, LP, Chair
Alan Roland, PhD, Former Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Time: Meets 6 x times a year on Fridays, Saturdays, or Sundays from September – June
for 90 minutes each = 9 hours
Total= 9 Contact hours

Presentations and lectures focus on contemporary theory and practice of psychoanalysis. Historical perspectives are explored vis-à-vis its relevance to current theory. The relationship between culture and psychoanalysis is delineated. The work of prominent psychoanalysts, philosophers, academicians, and writers are examined for their relevance to psychoanalysis.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Examine a historical perspective in psychoanalysis and its relevance to current theory.
– Describe a contemporary thinker’s work and its relevance to psychoanalysis.
– Explain the way that transference, countertransference, and resistance are viewed in contemporary clinical theory and practice.
– Define how contemporary practice utilizes and understands the function of dreams and their interpretation.
– Identify the interactions between socio-cultural-political influences and psychoanalysis and their significance to practice.

• The Artist in the Therapist /The Therapist in The Artist: A Creative Dialogue
Arthur Robbins, PhD
Robert Irwin Wolf, LP
Moderator: Alan Roland, PhD
Scientific Program
Alan Roland, PhD, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person panel
Date/Time: Friday, October 30, 2015, 7:30-9:30 PM
Total = 2 Contact hours

The presentation will explore the importance of the psychoaesthetic dimensions of working within the third analytic space between analyst and patient. We will then focus on how the utilization of photography and sculpture can stimulate the analyst’s own growth, and how this may then be integrated into clinical applications and practice.

Educational Objectives: After attending this presentation participants will be able to
– Describe the contemporary thinker’s work and its relevance to psychoanalysis.
– Explain the way that sculpture and photography influence clinical practice, transference/countertransference, and resistance.

• What’s the Story? Narrative in Psychoanalysis
Lee Jenkins, PhD
Art Pomponio, PhD
Scientific Program
Alan Roland, PhD, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person panel
Date/Time: Friday, December 4, 2015, 7:30-9:30 PM
Total= 2 Contact hours

Both psychoanalysis and literature can liberate. Both allow exposure to the range of human behavior and provide an understanding of why people behave the way they do. A reader can have his life illuminated through identification with and exposure to characters he reads about but he cannot change their fates. The psychoanalyst is, paradoxically, both removed from and involved in the fate of the patient and can contribute to the prospect of change. How a background in literature influences how a psychoanalyst thinks and works with patients.

After attending the program, participants will be able to
– Explain how a background in literature influences how a psychoanalyst thinks and works.
– Compare the literary and psychoanalytic understanding of character.
– Describe how the narratives in literature and psychoanalytic sessions compare with each other

•  The Arts of Playwriting, Poetry, and Psychoanalysis
Frederick Feirstein
Claire Steinberger (discussant)
Scientific Program
Alan Roland, PhD, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person panel
Date/Time: Friday, January 15, 2016, 7:30-9:30 PM
Total= 2 Contact hours

Fred Feirstein will be talking about how a key metaphor in the psychoanalytic dialogue and the manifest content of dreams can be seen as organizing the split off side of the psyche that repeats in the closet drama of treatment.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify key metaphors in patients’ associations and dreams.
– Describe the drama in the transference relationship.
– Explain how poetic sensibility resonates with psychoanalytic therapy.

• Going Nowhere – An Elaboration on the Role of the Father: The Preoedipal Father as a Crucial Component in Personality Integration
Hanna Turken, LCSW, BCD, LPsyA
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person lecture, workshop, discussion
Date/Time: Sunday, January 17, 2016, 5:30-7:00 PM
Total: 1.5 Contact hours

This presentation aims to convey the importance of the process of attachment, but most of all to underline the process of separation from the preoedipal father. Clinical cases emphasizing transference enactments and resolutions will support the analyst’s theoretical stance. Patients with these developmental issues feel that they are missing an “it” — are stuck, going nowhere. It is the therapist, who knows what “it” is, the one who will give the missing piece to them. Through the therapeutic process, patients are able to arrive at a more realistic assessment of themselves and others, a consolidation of ego ideal and superego introjects.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify the role of the preoedipal father in the child’s attachment and separation process of development.
– Describe the transference that leads to the person’s personality integration.

Where Spirituality and Psychoanalysis Meet: Exploring Dimensions of Intersubjective Space
Ruth Rosenbaum, LP
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Presentations, lectures and panels (power point, videos, films)
Sundays – February 28, March 6, March 13, April 3, April 10 and May 1, 2016; 5:30 – 7:00 PM
Time: 6 times for 90 minutes each = 9 hours
Total= 9 Contact hours

This course will demonstrate how an integration of psychoanalytic and spiritual perspectives in the mind of the analyst can enhance psychoanalytic treatment and help overcome therapeutic impasses. Shifts in conceptualizations of time and space that are implied by a spiritual perspective will be explored with a focus on clinical application. Psychoanalytic topics such as the intersubjective field, enactments, transference/countertransference, and unconscious communication will be described within this integrated model. The course will also address a variety of spiritual experiences reported by patients, offering ways of understanding and incorporating them in psychoanalytic practice. Dialogues between the instructor and other analysts whose work reflects this framework will be featured. Among them are: Richard Reichbart, Paul Cooper, and Alan Roland.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
– Define spirituality and its relationship to the psychoanalytic process.
– Explain how the intersubjective field that emerges from the patient-analyst interaction forms the common ground of psychoanalysis and spirituality.
– Discuss psychoanalytic concepts, such as intersubjectivity and the “analytic third” from an integrated spiritual/psychoanalytic perspective.
– Describe how unconscious processes evident in psychoanalytic work parallel spiritual experiences of nonlocal time and space.
– Discuss how the integration of psychoanalytic and spiritual perspectives can deepen psychoanalytic work and address analytic impasses.

• A Chinese Hamlet: Unconscious Fantasy and Trauma
Arlene Kramer Richards, EdD
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person lecture, discussion
Date/Time: Sunday, March 20, 2016, 5:30-7:00 PM
Total: 1.5 Contact hours

The presenter illustrates a supervisory case of a man in China who suddenly lost his formerly high capacity for functioning when he developed a fear of being outside his home and away from the immediate family. It traces the trans-generational transmission of trauma and the elaboration of a fantasy the he would re-experience his father’s traumatic death.  It compares his experience with that of Hamlet being compelled to madness by his father’s ghost.  The discussion includes cross-cultural analysis, trans-generational trauma, and the creative application of literary contributions and psychoanalytic inquiry.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able
– Describe how transgenerational trauma and fantasy are enacted in functioning.
– Discuss the way cross cultural factors and literary references contribute to psychoanalytic technique

•  The (In)Sane Society: Remembering Erich Fromm and the Frankfurt School: Erich Fromm’s Impact on Psychoanalytic Thinking and Practice
Scientific Programs
Alan Roland, PhD, Chair
Catherine Silver, PhD Co-Chair Panel
Co-sponsor: Lynn Chancer, CUNY Graduate Center Sociology Department and Hunter College

Location: NPAP, 40 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in person panels
Date/Time: Saturday, April 2, 2016, 2:00-8:20 PM
Presentations, lectures, and panels (powerpoint, videos and films)
Total: 6 contact hours

This conference provides a critical overview of the life and work of Erich Fromm in ways that address the complex interaction between self and society. Each panel discusses different aspects of Fromm’s contribution to psychoanalysis: theoretical, clinical, and philosophical. The contemporary relevance of Fromm’s ideas to a variety of issues in and outside of treatment is examined.

Panel I
Chair/Discussant: Mauricio Cortina, MD (Director, Attachment and Human Development Center, Washington School of Psychiatry, Washington D.C.)

This panel discussion identifies Erich Fromm’s challenges to Freudian orthodoxy and the search for continuity and change in theoretical formulations and techniques through the discussion of the work of Neil McLaughlin, PhD – When Worlds Collide: Optimal Marginality, Social Science and Fromm’s Revision of Freud and Jay Kwawer, PhD (William Alanson White Institute) – “The Rise and Fall of the Label King”: On Marketing Narcissism.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to:
– Assess the changes in theoretical formulations from orthodox Freudian to Relational models through the work of Erich Fromm
– Identify the historical and theoretical importance of the concept of Character Structure

Panel II
Co-Chairs: Neil McLaughlin and Catherine Silver
Discussant: Catherine Silver, PhD (The CUNY Graduate Center and the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis)

This panel focuses on the socio-historical conditions that gave rise to Fromm’s involvement with Zen Buddhism as well as clinical issues that characterize Fromm’s “The Art of Listening.” Alan Roland, PhD (National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis) addresses The Socio-Historical, Psychoanalytic Context of Erich Fromm’s Involvement with Zen Buddhism. Sandra Buechler, PhD (William Alanson White Institute) addresses Choosing Life: Fromm’s Clinical Values.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to:
– Identify Fromm’s techniques in the art of listening as part of the clinical process.
– Evaluate the links between psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism and identify cross-cultural issues.

Panel III
Chair: Catherine Silver, PhD
Discussants: Donald Carveth, PhD (Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis)

This panel opens up the question of the ethical basis of psychoanalysis, inside and outside the clinical setting. It addresses the issue of what are the goals of treatment from a variety of perspectives. Karen Morris, LP (Institute for Expressive Analysis, NY) addresses The Legacy of Erich Fromm: Carrying the Corpse of Love, and Daniel Shaw, LCSW, (National Institute for the Psychotherapies and Westchester Institute for the Study of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy) addresses Fromm’s Vision of a Sane World: Love vs. Narcissism.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to:
– Describe how social and institutional factors can shape the process of treatment.
– Explain the tensions between love and narcissism in the context of a modern society.

Concluding comments: Lynn Chancer

•  The How We Work Series
Judy Kaplan, MSW, LCSW, Instructor/Moderator
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Case Presenter: Laura D’Angelo, LP
Live Supervision by: Loveleen Posmentier, LP, Arthur Robbins, PhD
Panelists: Leah Pittell Jacobs, MSW, LCSW; Adriana Passini, MSW, LCSW; Florence Rowe, MSW, LCSW
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person panel
Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 2016, 4:00-7:00 PM
Total = 3 Contact hours

The live supervision session and the discussion by the panelists will demonstrate the method of the supervisory process viewed from various theoretical perspectives, including concepts of transference, countertransference, enactments, resistance, and more. The case presenter will present the same case to the two supervisors separately so that the audience can observe the differences between their supervisory styles. The second supervisor will be absent while the case is presented to the first supervisor and vice versa. Afterwards there will be a short discussion by the panelists, followed by questions and comments from the audience.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to
– Differentiate between different styles of supervision that are based on the supervisor’s theoretical orientations.
– Describe the areas of difficultly in the case for which supervision is sought.
– Identify how the transference, countertransference, and enactments are handled in the case.

•  Malignant Passionate Attachments: Unbearable Separations
Graciela Abelin-Sas Rose, MD
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live In-Person lecture, workshop, discussion
Date/Time: Sunday, June 12, 2016, 5:30-7:00 PM
Total: 1.5 Contact hours

This presentation, by an illuminating, internationally known psychoanalyst, encapsulates a foray into love, passion, and its blind alleys. How does passion become lethal and stifling, so that attachment dominates the psyche and fatally entraps it.  At such times, separation and growth are no longer attainable and self-disintegration occurs. What psychoanalytic understanding can unlock such misery? The presenter postulates that “retrieving the original pathogenic experience, translating it into a narrative form liberates patients from their frozen passionate relationships.” Clinical material will elucidate the theory.

After attending the presentation participants will be able to
– Describe how therapy addresses patients with lethal attachments to love and passion.
– Identify how self-disintegration occurs for patients with such strong attachment needs for love and passion.

• Lest We Forget: Two Essential Components of the Psychoanalytic Paradigm
Fred Busch, PhD, FIPA
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair (co-sponsor with MITO)
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture
Meets: Saturday, October 1, 2016, 2:00-5:30 pm
Total = 3.5 CE Contact hours

In this program the presenter will involve us in two key elements of psychoanalytic understanding and the psychoanalytic method that sometimes seem to be forgotten, i.e., the role of the drives in every aspect of our patient’s lives, and how we help patients via creating a psychoanalytic mind. Following the discussion of the drives, Dr. Busch’s clinical case will demonstrate a way of working that highlights the necessity of the patient to find her own mind. The work of Cordelia Schmidt-Hellerau, PhD, FIPA, will be featured.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify the unconscious motivation and basic trajectory underlying their patients’ clinical material.
– Discuss ways for patients to gain greater self-awareness.

• Self States in Search of Body-Mind Connectivity
Evelyn Rappoport, PhD
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture
Sunday, October 16, 2016, 5:30-7:00 pm
Total = 1.5 CE Contact hours

This presentation emphasizes embodied knowing and the sensory and somatic registers of feeling states or e-motions held as both “known and unknown” in the living body. Clinical vignettes and case material with two highly traumatized patients will be offered as examples of the presenter’s integrative approach with the body as subject and with the physiology of different self-state configurations. In her clinical work, the presenter incorporates somatic imagery; mirroring, movement and rhythmic sensory attunement to promote self and mutual regulation and facilitate increased affect tolerance. Tracking micro-moments of experience and employing invitational experiential language in the analytic space, implicit somatic memories are accessed, linked, mentalized and re-consolidated.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Discuss self-states and “not me” states as they present in the somatic transference and countertransference matrix.
– Identify somatic markers and arousal level in the body, which hold inchoate dissociated elements of experience.

• The Skin Ego Theory: Early Influence in Infancy of Narcissistic Disorders – The Psychoanalytic Contributions of Didier Anzieu
Christine Anzieu-Premmereur, MD, PhD
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture
Sunday, November 6, 2016, 5:30-7:00 pm
Total = 1.5 CE Contact hours

The presenter will review the pioneering contributions of French psychoanalyst Didier Anzieu (1923-1999) which begins with Freud’s Self Analysis, written while Anzieu was in analysis with Lacan. Anzieu developed his own critique of modern psychoanalysis, emphasizing ideas related to the role of metaphor and bodily experience, “paradoxical transference” and “transitional analysis”. Anzieu’s work elaborates on the formative role of the “skin ego”, particularly linking “containing” and “protective field” functions with psychic organization. The presenter will explore application to borderline and narcissistic patients, extending from her evocative paper, The Skin-Ego: Dyadic Sensuality, Trauma in Infancy and Adult Narcissistic Issues (The Psychoanalytic Review, October 2015).

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Describe the “skin ego” in psychic organization.
– Discuss ways to apply the theory to narcissistic and borderline patients.

• Freud/Ferenczi Papers
Neil Skolnick (Narrator), Elliot Adler (Freud), Isaac Tylim (Ferenczi), Louise Decosta (Gezella Palos and director)
Clinical Programs
Alice Entin, MSW, LCSW, Chair (Co-sponsored with the Ad Hoc Fundraising Committee)
Location: The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, New York, NY 10012
Live in-person: Dramatic reading
Sunday, December 4, 2016, 5:00-7:00 pm
Total = 2.0 CE Contact hours

This dramatic reading based on more than twelve hundred letters between Sandor Ferenczi and Sigmund Freud highlights the in depth influence of these two men on each other and the psychoanalytic movement during the early years of the 20th Century.

Ferenczi became Freud’s analysand, intimate friend, and collaborator, eventually adding ideas of his own, which, at times, led to controversy. Together, they wrestled with the beginning foundation of an untested therapy and the virulent criticism of a skeptical scientific community. This was in the midst of the chaos and privation of a world going through cataclysmic political transformation. Many of the tensions that each of us face in our daily clinical practice may be illuminated by an appreciation of how these two men confronted and handled the multiple challenges of their 25-year relationship.

After attending a presentation, participants will be able to
– Describe the influences that Freud and Ferenczi had on each other that contributed to psychoanalytic theory.
– Discuss the divergence in theory of Freud and Ferenczi.

• Childhood Trauma and the Drive to Achieve Greatness
Sue Erikson Bloland, LCSW
Steve Yagerman, LP, Chair, Scientific Program Committee
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person lecture
Time/Date: Friday, January 27, 2017, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
Total = 2.0 CE Contact hours

Based on her knowledge of the childhood of her father – Erik Erikson – and her exploration into the early lives of other highly accomplished individuals throughout human history, Bloland will draw a connection between early trauma (loss of a parent, neglect or abuse) and the origin of a consuming drive to greatness. Psychoanalysts assume trauma has a disorganizing effect on human functioning. What kind of trauma is it that can set in motion a highly focused and effective pursuit of recognition and admiration? Why is it that even the most extraordinary success in achieving this goal does not, in the end, heal the wounds of childhood? Bloland asks us to examine our own fantasies about the emotional rewards of celebrity.

After the presentation, participants will be able to
– Identify several types of childhood trauma that are frequently associated with an obsessive drive toward high achievement.
– Distinguish between genuine self-esteem and the appearance of exceptional self-confidence that tends to accompany celebrity.

•  A Beholder’s Share
Dodi Goldman, PhD
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture
Date/Time: Friday, February 10, 2017, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
Total = 2 CE contact hours

A well-educated young woman who was raised in a secular family claims she has discrete experiences of “feeling God’s presence.” How might her psychoanalyst understand her experience? Can it even be described without foisting beliefs upon it? Together with his analysand, the presenter wrestles with questions of clashes of belief in treatment and the uses and abuses of imagination. A basic human quandary at the heart of this talk is how a sense of reality is evoked in the unpredictable space between imagination and adaptation.

After attending the presentation, participants will be able to
– Describe how psychoanalysts can effectively work with the imaginative contents of analysands, while neither dismissing them as hallucinations or accepting the philosophical or theological assumptions of the patient.
– Examine one’s own suppositions as a therapist about what lies beneath and beyond the realm of consensus reality.

• Grief and The Psychoanalyst
Alice Entin, LCSW
Clinical Programs
Location: NPAP, 40 West 13 Street, New York, NY 10011
Live in-person: Lecture/Workshop
Date: Sunday, March 19, 2017, 5:30-7:00 pm
Total = 1.5 CE Contact hours

Grief is often a terrifying experience. It can also be invisible in both the patient and the analyst. Freud’s essay “Mourning and Melancholia” has been a guiding principle of the psychoanalytic work. What about the psychoanalyst’s grief? What does theory teach us? The analyst’s lived experience of grief is not necessarily what we have been trained to see or understand. The workshop will explore our newer understanding of the forms grief takes and the way it demands care.

After the presentation, participants will be able to
– Discuss the more contemporary theories around grief in light of Freud’s concepts on mourning.
– Describe complicated grief of the therapist that influences the treatment.